Posts Tagged as broker

Finding True Job Satisfaction in Real Estate

Real Estate is an entrepreneurial business. Each agent or broker who makes it, puts his or her heart, soul, spirit, effort, professional and personal self on the line every day. In some ways, this puts you a step ahead of the general population, because it’s unlikely you went into the risks of entrepreneurship for something you didn’t feel passionate about. Sure, some people are only in for the money, but, from experience, they don’t end up succeeding as well as those who do it for the love of the industry itself, the freedom of self-employment, and the ability to have just that little bit more control over their lives. With risk comes reward, and that reward is job satisfaction.

Real Estate is an entrepreneurial business. Each agent or broker who makes it, puts his or her heart, soul, spirit, effort, professional and personal self on the line every day. In some ways, this puts you a step ahead of the general population, because it’s unlikely you went into the risks of entrepreneurship for something you didn’t feel passionate about. Sure, some people are only in for the money, but, from experience, they don’t end up succeeding as well as those who do it for the love of the industry itself, the freedom of self-employment, and the ability to have just that little bit more control over their lives. With risk comes reward, and that reward is job satisfaction.

I recently saw a blog post on motivation by Chester Elton, co-author of What Motivates Me: Put Your Passions to Work, with Adrian Gostick, and it struck a chord. Elton wrote about his 20+ year career as a consultant, particularly the last 10 years, in which he and his team conducted three research studies on workplace trends, comprising more than 850,000 interviews. All those interviews, all that research, all that data answered some questions. More than that, it highlighted a “key difference in those people who are most energized on the job.”

So what is that key difference? Well, Elton says, “The happiest have aligned more of their work with their core motivations. As for those people who are most unhappy at work, as you might expect, their jobs are out of whack with what they are passionate about.”

One of the key findings is that most people who are unhappy and lack passion feel overwhelmed and powerless to change things, because many of them are waiting (without end) for a manager to step in and save things. But, guess what? As a real estate professional, chances are good that you are your manager. You can make changes and pursue your passion. You can do what you love every day and achieve true job satisfaction.

“In our research,” says Elton, “we have found that each individual is driven by a unique set, or blend, of internal and external drivers. Every person on this planet has a thumbprint-like makeup of what makes him or her most happy 9-to-5 (and in the rest of life); and those thumbprints vary considerably.”

Elton’s team of behavioral scientists mined a decade of data to identify 23 workplace motivators that ranged from creativity to impact, and developing others to money.

“The bottom line is this: If we want to be happily engaged in our work and performing at our fullest potential, we’ve got to look inside and understand a few of these specific motivators that drive us. All of us host a unique blend of motivations that should guide us in sculpting the work life that’s right for us,” Elton says.

Here’s the really great news: the happiest people interviewed didn’t make huge changes to their career paths, they didn’t up and quit; what they did was make strategic course corrections to the path they were already on. You’re on the right track. If you’re not totally satisfied, it may only require a little tweaking or modification. Elton and Gostick call this “job sculpting.”

“There are individuals and teams among us who are deeply fulfilled by their work, who are passionate about what they do, and are energized when Monday comes. So what’s their secret? In most cases, they have taken control of their careers. When our jobs give us the opportunity to do more of the kinds of things that satisfy our key motivations, we are naturally happier and more engaged.”

It’s not an easy process, but let’s face it – if you wanted easy you wouldn’t be self-employed; you wouldn’t have chosen a real estate profession. You make hard choices every day. It’s not too much to ask that you make decisions that put you on the path to real professional satisfaction. It will spill over into all areas of your life.

Goof-for Business

Why Blogging is Good for Your Business

Twenty years ago, a solid marketing strategy for real estate involved putting ads in the newspaper and leaving signature FOR SALE posts on properties. Now, with the digital age among us, this type of marketing is just simply not enough. In order to stay on top, real estate businesses, as well as all types of businesses, have to learn how to get noticed online. One of the greatest tools for receiving online attention is blogging. And I’m going to spend the next few paragraphs telling you exactly why blogging is good for your business.

Twenty years ago, a solid marketing strategy for real estate involved putting ads in the newspaper and leaving signature FOR SALE posts on properties. Now, with the digital age among us, this type of marketing is just simply not enough. In order to stay on top, real estate businesses, as well as all types of businesses, have to learn how to get noticed online. One of the greatest tools for receiving online attention is blogging. And I’m going to spend the next few paragraphs telling you exactly why blogging is good for your business.

What is a Blog?

A blog is like an online, interactive journal. While they can be used for personal or public use, their function can often vary. Blogs are similar to articles, and can be found on designated websites to inform or entertain readers, who are often allowed to rate or comment on the material. For businesses, blogging is a great way to share knowledge, attract readers (or potential clients), gain credibility, advertise, and improve search engine page rank through better search engine optimization (SEO).

Making the Most Out of Blogs

In terms of improving business, blogs are an easy way to improve online popularity. When someone is searching for real estate agents online, you want your service to be the first to pop up on Google. Blogs have the power to make this happen and here’s how:

Search engines, like Google or Bing, rely on an intense algorithm to find websites when you search using a series of words. Websites that are frequently updated, well respected, contain large amounts of data, and are linked to other sites are typically the first websites to show up in a search. By posting blogs on your own site and by publishing more information, you are expanding the website and increasing its chance of hitting a lucky component in the search engine’s algorithm. When posting blogs on other sites, known as off-site optimization, it is important to include inbound links to your site and to write quality blogs. These components of blogging are targeted ingredients that a search engine look for and will make your site stand out from the rest.

Blog and Get Noticed

For real estate blogging, businesses tend to inform audiences on the housing market, quarterly reports, and events going on locally. This is an easy way to outreach readers (potential clients) and keep content current, all while improving your marketing strategy. When it comes down to it, a solid use of blogging not only makes your website look better, it can also improve your business’s SEO performance and land your website among the first pages in a search engine’s results.

real estate agent

Profile of a Real Estate Agent – Is this You?

The United States Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) tells us that “real estate brokers and sales agents help clients buy, sell, and rent properties. Brokers and agents do the same type of work, but brokers are licensed to manage their own real estate businesses. Sales agents must work with a broker.”

Across the United States, 57% of real estate brokers and sales agents are self-employed (as of most recent available statistics from 2010). “Although they often work long and irregular hours, many are able to set their own schedules,” says the BLS.

According to the Bureau, the typical real estate broker or sales agent:

• Earns approximately $42,680* annually or $20.52 per hour (median pay).

• Has at least a high school diploma or equivalent.

• Is one of 466,100 agents/brokers in the country.

• Can expect a job growth rate outlook of 11% between now and 2020 (The average growth rate for all occupations is 14%.

*The median annual wage of real estate brokers is $54,910, while the median annual wage of real estate agents is $40,030, says the BLS. Brokers and agents earn most of their income from commissions on sales.

Of those 43% of agents and brokers who are not self-employed, most work in the real estate industry in brokerage offices, leasing offices, and other real estate establishments. “While some real estate brokers and sales agents work in a typical office environment, others are able to telecommute and work out of their homes. In both cases, however, workers spend much of their time away from their desks—showing properties to customers, traveling to see properties for sale, and meeting with prospective clients.”

Hours beyond the standard 40-hour work week are typical for a broker or an agent, and networking is a key aspect of a successful career.

The Bureau specifies four qualities that are important to a real estate broker or sales agent:

1. Independence. Real estate brokers and sales agents must be able to work independently, managing their own time and organizing, planning, and prioritizing their work. Some brokers manage a one-person business in which they must handle every aspect of the business.

2. Interpersonal skills. Strong interpersonal skills are essential for real estate brokers and sales agents, because they spend much of their time interacting with clients and customers. As a result, they must be pleasant, enthusiastic, and trustworthy to attract clients.

3. Persuasion skills. Real estate brokers and sales agents need to be persuasive to convince potential clients of their ability to sell real estate and to persuade customers to buy available properties.

4. Problem-solving skills. Real estate brokers and sales agents need problem-solving skills to address, often immediately, any concerns clients or potential customers may have with a property. They also mediate negotiations between the seller and buyer.

So, how about it? Is this an accurate portrayal of you?

Social Media Stats You Should Care About: Facebook (Part 1)

Welcome to Part 1 of a 3-part series on social media statistics. As we’ve discussed in previous posts, your online presence, such as your property website, is important. Social media is a critical tie in. Check out some of these stats and you’ll soon see why not participating means you’ll be left behind.

Facebook’s rise never ceases to amaze us – it went from a net income of $229 million in 2009 to a cool $1 billion last year. It is the world’s most popular social network, currently with some 845 million active monthly users, making some 100 billion connections. 425 million users globally access Facebook from their mobile phones.

North America has the second highest percentage of active Facebook users (after Asia), with more than 50% of its population on the site. More than 174,500,000 Facebook users live in North America!

Facebook users are 57% female and 43% male. They upload 250 million photos every day, and spend an average of 20 minutes at a time on the site. That Facebook thumps up ‘Like’ button? It’s clicked 2.7 billion times a day (make sure some of those ‘Likes’ belong to your business page!).

RE Business Pages

Facebook is much more than a fad. It provides a fantastic, FREE opportunity to connect with potential clients, buyers and sellers, to promote your brand, business and listings, and to share knowledge with a network that grows all the time.

We’ll see you again soon for Parts 2 & 3 of this series, where we’ll look at Twitter and LinkedIn.