Posts Tagged as for sellers

Market Watch: Updated 2018 Changes to Buyer Demographics

Market Watch: Updated 2018 Changes to Buyer Demographics

Following an exciting 2017 buying season, real estate trends point to a few changes on the horizon. What will 2018 have in store?

Changes Predicted for the 2018 Home Buying Season
Stay on your toes and be on the lookout for these changing real estate trends:

– Baby Boomers Finally Ready to Downsize

Baby boomers are finally letting go of larger traditional and colonial-style homes, and are ready to downsize in retirement. What are they looking for? A smaller footprint and single-story living, so they won’t have to navigate perilous stairways as they age. How does this translate into the market? Rising demand is expected to push up the prices of single-story dwellings.

– Millennials Compromising on the Suburbs

Though many millennials have their sights set on urban life and activity, millennial buyers, who could make up 43% of the home buying market by the close of 2018, are prioritizing affordability and quality of life – a shift which is pushing this segment out into the suburbs. Last year, the undeniable shortage of entry-level homes posed a huge hurdle for this group, the nation’s largest buyer segment.

– Post-Bubble Foreclosure Sufferers Re-Entering the Market

The more than 10-million Americans forced into foreclosure during the Great Recession have put in their 7-year, foreclosure law penance. Sick of renting and itching to re-enter the market, how many will become eligible in 2018? Around a whopping 1.5 million Americans according to the National Center for Policy Analysis, adding pressure to an already strained supply of home inventory.

Still a Seller’s Market

As buyer demand remains strong in the current year, home prices will continue to soar. This will continue to add to the stresses of first time buyers, foreclosure sufferers, and cash-strapped retirees, struggling with a lack of affordable home options and a dearth of down payment cash.

How will changing real estate trends effect your business? Stay in-the-know with the help of Properties Online.

Market Watch: What's Hot and What's Not in Home Design

Market Watch: What’s Hot and What’s Not in Home Design

We can’t always be experts on interior design, which is why a bit of professional advice is always welcome. In today’s real estate trends, we’ll look at what’s hot in home design from the 2018 Interior Design Show.

The Kitchen as a Focal Point
Kitchen upgrades remain a key investment opportunity, not just in design, but in technology. In today’s homes, there are an array of opportunities for design and technology to meet, and this is especially true in the kitchen. Now seen as a place to gather and even entertain, not just a place to cook, opportunities abound for kitchen personalization in both the design and technology genres. From multifunctional kitchen islands to smart refrigerators, stoves, and more, design elements turn the kitchen into an ideal second living space, the hub of the home.

Durable Materials with Clean Lines
Topping off favored kitchen materials: Engineered quartz, whose fabrication advancements have opened new doors in other areas of the home as well, surrounding tubs, showers and even fireplaces. Heavier, contrasting concretes are also quite popular surfaces around the home. Clean lines are big, with distressed wood cabinets replaced by cleaner, sharper surfaces, including boldly painted cabinet fascia.

Curvy Furnishings
Curves and soft round edges in all types of furniture, from chairs and tables to lighting, are cropping up. Lighting is more than functional, it is sculptural, with homeowners investing in lighting as they do artwork: The more fixtures the better.

Extending Living Space Outdoors
Due to limited space and sometimes crowded living quarters, extending living space outdoors continues to rise in popularity, making outdoor living spaces among the most popular real estate trends to date. Here customization opportunities abound as well, from outdoor kitchen, dining, and bar additions, to living areas, game rooms, private garden retreats, and even outdoor office space.

Strive for a listing that home buyers warm to with the hottest real estate trends from Properties Online today.

Shutting Down the Money - Chinese Real Estate Investments Dry Up

Shutting Down the Money – Chinese Real Estate Investments Dry Up

In surprising real estate trends, China’s investments in the U.S. real estate market are speedily drying up. A recent Cushman and Wakefield report highlighted the trend, noting a drop from $16.2-billion to $7.3-billion in 2016, and estimating a 55% drop in commercial real estate investments in 2017.

Why are Times Changing?
The unusually hasty retreat has been fueled by at least two factors:

Beijing’s Leaders Restricting the Flow of Cash Out of the Country
In August, China’s State Council imposed new regulations on outbound investments designed to keep capital at home and reduce the risk of runaway debt. With a massive impact on real estate trends, the move highlights the potentially dramatic effects of state-directed capitalism. Ordered by the government to sell or dispose of foreign properties, investors from state-controlled conglomerates are selling rapidly after acquisition – in some cases, before building.

Federal EB-5 Program Funding Drops, Limiting Green Card Access
The federal EB-5 program, which allows foreigners to apply for U.S. citizenship in exchange for investing $500,000 or more in a business that makes or preserves at least 10 jobs, is losing fuel. With a huge drop-off in funding, EB-5 cash from China has dropped to just 28% of its normal flow compared to the three preceding years. In the past, the millions of dollars raised in the green card program have funded major projects, including the Courtyard Los Angeles L.A. Live and the Dream Hotel complex in Hollywood.

Big Picture
Though the drop is dramatic, Cushman and Wakefield still predict Chinese capital will continue to play a significant role in the U.S. economy. Despite pulling back on new purchases, Chinese investors are not jumping ship, and are still buying more than they’re selling. However a shift is being seen, from state-controlled conglomerates to very high net worth individuals.

Are you evolving alongside today’s rapidly changing real estate trends? Stay in-the-know with the help of Properties Online today.

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The Data’s In, 2017 Looks Like It Will Be a Seller’s Market!

Still bitter with the real estate industry following the market’s 2008 downturn? Real estate selling in 2017 and beyond may offer some karmic retribution. A seller’s market is predicted, though a buyer’s market is not too far off on the horizon.

What “the experts” are saying
Most economists agree 2017 will be a strong seller’s market, though buyers are expected to have their day in 2018 or 2019.

• Matthew Gardner, chief economist at Windermere
Gardner expects inventory to rise in 2017, but not to sufficient levels to support the currently stretched market. Inventory will take a little longer to sell, but as the job market continues to tighten, demand will continue to outstrip supply.

• Mark Fleming, chief economist at First American
Assuming a market with modestly and predictably rising mortgage rates, Fleming believes first-time buyers will drive the market, pointing to a demographic that’s young (millennial), diverse, technologically savvy, and predominately college-educated.

• Jonathan Smoke, chief economist at realtor.com
Smoke sees market potential for a high volume of first-time buyers, but with geography playing a role: Some markets will be above-average in price expectation or sales expectation – but few will be above-average in both. In seller’s markets, supply constraint will be driving the price; In buyer’s markets, “great buys” are pushing sales growth. The good news? Either is good for the real estate selling business.

• Svenja Gudell, chief economist at Zillow
Gudell sees a market skewing to sellers, with more purchases on the outskirts of the city compared to the urban center, with its much higher price tags. She warns to expect higher cancelation rates and lower conversion rates in today’s challenging financing environment, with pent-up demand declining, in favor of more organic activity as interest rates rise.

Looking forward to a better real estate selling future in the coming years? Looks like the market may finally be on your side. Take advantage, with the help of Properties Online today.

Our Secrets: Tips You'd Love to Share with Sellers

5 Good Reasons to Use a Real Estate Agent

Unless you are a realtor or retired agent, it’s not a smart idea and may cost you in real dollars. Here are 5 good reasons to use a real estate agent.

As the real estate industry continues to move online, and as buyers and sellers have increasingly easy access to real estate data and information, more and more buyers and sellers may decide to go it alone, without the help of a real estate professional. But unless you are a realtor or a retired agent, it’s not generally a smart idea and may cost the home seller in real dollars. Here are 5 good reasons to use a real estate agent. Drumroll, please …

Split the check. Really, the major reason people choose to buy and sell homes without a professional comes down to money. They want to save on commission. But what if buyer AND seller are playing this game? The sale price of a home takes an agent’s commission into account. Comps on houses in your area are made on houses that overwhelmingly are sold by agent. But if they buyer is also going agent-free, they’ll likely offer down, because they know the agent’s fee isn’t necessary. Buyer and seller can’t collect the unpaid commission. Someone’s going to lose.

Don’t you already have a full time job? Selling or buying property can be extremely time intensive. There is a lot of research to begin, home viewing, deal making, negotiating, etc. Whether you work outside the home or not, unlike a professional realtor, I can bet you aren’t working the real estate circuit 40+ hours a week. A qualified agent has access to properties and agents you don’t, can track down and vet houses that meet your specifications, schedule appointments and play phone tag on your behalf. Selling without an agent is even more time consuming and a lot less fun. You have to solicit all the calls from potential buyers, someone weed out the looky-loos, answer questions, show viewers through your home, prep and stage, and more. What happens if the home doesn’t sell in a timely fashion? It starts to get a bad rep. Not worth it.

Did you captain the debate team in high school? Negotiating is tricky business. Sellers often have a lot of personal attachment and can’t see things outside of that bias. Buyers may not feel confident about speaking up when they see a potential issue. Or they may feel overly confident and do damage when they simply want to criticize what they see as hideous decorating techniques. Agents can represent your interests, leaving the parties with emotional involvement right out of the thick of things. Deals have gone dead over insults, real or imagined. Let your agent play the bad cop, if necessary. Let them schmooze, too.

It’s a trust thing. Your agent, if working under a conventional, full-service commission agreement, is bound by law to work in your best interests. Now that doesn’t mean all agents are created equal and all are equally trustworthy. But it does mean that you have recourse if something goes wrong. Your agent is responsible to his broker or professional association and to the state in which he is licensed. What’s more, your agent probably got your business based on referral. And he or she will count on you to do the same. This is further incentive, beyond the legal obligation, to put your needs first when it comes to buying or selling a home. On the other hand, if you buy from a FSBO and you’re without an agent, you have two people working for their own interests, with much less holding them to honesty and accountability. Hiring a lawyer later is much more expensive than securing a real estate agent at the start.

Sign on the dotted line. Speaking of lawyers, you may need one if you choose not to use an agent or broker. Contracts are vital, and they aren’t always easy to understand. What if you fail to make financing one of the conditions of the sale, for instance, and then find you aren’t approved for the mortgage? The seller could sue you, could keep your deposit, and could derail your home buying dream. Using an agent ensures you have someone on your side well versed in real estate contracts who can look out for any red flags or potential pit falls and make sure you have everything you need secured and in writing from the get-go.

Real estate isn’t a simple business. Do yourself a favor and rely on a professional. Happy house hunting and selling!

Agents, please feel free to send this on to your clients or share it on your own blogs and social media (with proper credit). And let me know any other reasons you suggest home buyers and sellers use a real estate professional!